2 april 2012: 10 jaar geleden plaatsten we onderstaand berichtje over de rol van voeding en leefstijl op de kans om borstkanker te overleven onder de Japanese bevolking. We hebben hieronder toegevoegd een abstract en deeplink naar volledige studie rapport dat u gratis kunt inzien naar de rol van leefstijl en voeding in de preventie en behandeling van borstkanker. Ook hebben we een referentielijst erbij gezet.

Mei 2002:

Groot onderzoek naar effect voeding en leefstijl geeft voor Japanese vrouwen met borstkanker 29% grotere overlevingskans (10 jaar) in vergelijking met vrouwen in de USA In Japan bleken bij onderzoek tussen 1955 en 1975 vrouwen met aangetoonde borstkanker een 29% hogere kans te hebben na 10 jaar nog in leven te zijn dan in de USA! Dit na correctie voor leeftijd, tumorgrootte en agressiviteit, lichaamsgewicht, etc. Uit andere emigratiestudies volgde dat dit niet het effect van een ander ras was. De reguliere behandeling in beide landen stond op een even hoog peil. Dus... hoewel geen keihard bewijs, is dit een sterke aanwijzing voor een effect van voeding op overleving bij kanker. In Japan eet men bijvoorbeeld algemeen minder vet, en meer sojaproducten (met genisteine) , groene thee (met catechinen) en vis (met omega-3 vet) dan in de USA.  Zie ook W.D. Nixon en K. Rodgers: "Breast cancer", hoofdstuk uit het boek "Nutritional Oncology" van de reguliere Harvard Universiteit in de USA, (Eds. D. Heber, G.L. Blackburn en V.L.W. Go), pag. 449, uitgegeven door Academic Press, Londen-San Diego, 1999. (ISBN 0 12 335960 0). Een absolute must voor ieder die als arts of therapeut betrokken is bij de relatie voeding-kanker.

Risk factors for breast cancer: epidemiological evidence from Japanese studies

Bron:Cancer Sci. 2011 Sep;102(9):1607-14. doi: 10.1111/j.1349-7006.2011.01996.x. Epub 2011 Jul 1.

Als u hier klikt kunt u het volledige studie rapport in een PDF file gratis inzien.  

Cancer Sci. 2011 Sep;102(9):1607-14. doi: 10.1111/j.1349-7006.2011.01996.x. Epub 2011 Jul 1.

Risk factors for breast cancer: epidemiological evidence from Japanese studies.

Source

Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan. moiwasak@ncc.go.jp

Abstract

Although our understanding of the etiology of breast cancer has improved, many well-known risk factors are not modifiable and present knowledge has proved insufficient to allow the disease to be overcome. Indeed, incidence and mortality among Japanese women have increased over the past three decades. Here, we review epidemiological evidence from our cohort and case-control studies among Japanese women in comparison with other published findings. Our studies confirm the important role of established factors derived primarily from Western populations, such as menstrual and reproductive factors, anthropometric factors, physical activity, and alcohol intake, in the development of breast cancer. In addition, we provide further evidence to better understand the role of traditional Japanese foods in the etiology of breast cancer. Our cohort study found that a higher intake of isoflavone and higher levels of plasma genistein, but not daidzein, were associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer. Our case-control studies reveal a dose-response pattern for these compounds; specifically, decreased risk as women move from "no" to "moderate" intake and leveling off thereafter. In addition, gene-environment interactions have been revealed in the effects of isoflavones. The evidence reviewed suggests that isoflavone has a protective effect against breast cancer in Asian populations. Conversely, our cohort study did not observe an inverse association between breast cancer risk and the intake of green tea and/or the plasma level of tea polyphenols, but we did find an association between increased risk and active and passive smoking. In conclusion, based on current knowledge, primary prevention according to individual lifestyle modification should focus on alcohol intake, weight control, physical activity, and tobacco smoking.

© 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

PMID:
21624009
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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